Friday, October 16, 2015

Resistance Training for Rowing

Resistance training for rowers Personal Training Clifton

Rowers often look towards the gym to give them the edge over rivals. While training competitive rowers over the last 15 years and have found a number of specific resistance exercises very useful. Resistance training alone wont make a champion rower but when used correctly it will improve your performance in the boat.

 Rowing stands alone from other sports in a number of unique ways. The high demands placed on the muscular system by nearly recruiting every muscle in the body in a repetitive action while using dynamic and static components throughout the stroke. Unlike most other sports that require bipedal locomotion (Running and swimming), In rowing both the lower and upper limbs produce force in the same action at the same time. Therefore rowing has some specific needs from a well-designed  resistance programme.

In my opinion and experience the most important factor for improvement at a sport is to practise the sport. Most of your training should be on the water; resistance training should range from a minimum of two weekly sessions with a maximum of four or five sessions depending on your competition level and how much time you can put into training.

Stay away from split workout programmes. Focus on total body works when training for rowing. Training the nervous system is highly specific. Isolating body parts as seen in many traditional weight-training exercises will adapt the nervous system to be more efficient at isolated movement. If you train the nervous system to isolate individual muscle groups it will decrease its ability to coordinate muscle groups into complex movements such as jumping or throwing a ball. Using compound exercises will train the nervous system to coordinate between multiple muscle groups and to achieve a greater number of complex movement patterns. This closely resembles the athletic demands placed on our coordination during rowing.

Over the last 15 years training competitive rowers from club to international level I have made some changes to existing exercises and found some specific techniques .The exercises below are a small selection and not the only exercises I would recommend, they are not to be used as a standalone programme. I take each athlete as an individual case and design a specific periodised programme depending on their abilities, weaknesses and goals.

Before commencing any of these exercises seek clearance from a medical practitioner.
                                                                                        
Barbell Front Squat
The squat is one of the prime exercise patterns for rowing.  From the catch phase the drive is initiated by the rectus femoris (One of the Quads) The hamstrings and gluteus maximus work as pelvic stabilises during the drive. The start of the drive phase is where the greatest increase in power output is seen during stoke. Both squats and the drive phase activate similar muscles.  

Back Squat vs Front Squat.

Which is better back or front Squat?  Although the main advantage with the back squat for rowers is an increase in maximal lift compare to the front squat. I would choose front squat over back squat for most rowers. I have found though experience there is an increased danger of lower back injuries for some rowers during the back squat. 

This is due to the repetitive natural of the sport creating muscular imbalances. Because of the muscle groups used during the rowing stroke two changes to posture can be seen, forward hip tilt and lower back lordosis ( Tight lower parapinals, tight hip flexor and weak hamstrings). With some of the rowers I have trained there has been an imbalance between the lower paraspinals (Lower back muscles on the sides of the spine) and the gluteals. With an increase in strength of a muscle group you often see a shortening of that group. When the lower paraspinals become stronger and shorter they can contribute towards lordosis (excessive inward curvature of the lower spine).

 During the back squat loading though the lumber vertebra is huge. Lumber lordosis changes the loading away from the body of the vertebra toward the spinal cord. It can also results in a difference in the thickness between the front and back parts of the intervertebral disc (wedge affect). The front squat has a more upright trunk position during the lift. This can decrease the curve from lordosis and improve the loading on the lower spine.
  














(Source: Excelsiorgroup. Image by Unknown)

Starting Position
Feet should be between hip and shoulder width apart, toes forward and slightly outward. Keep elbows high, eyes on the horizon and the chest up. Move with hips first then knees. Squat as if sitting into a chair, keeping the abdominals strong.  Breathe in as you descend.









Finishing Position
Stop decent if the heels start to rise or the pelvis tilts backward. How deep you go depends on your flexibility, lifting experience and form.   Then drive up to starting position, keep chest up and eyes above horizon. Breathe out as you rise up using a valsalva maneuver. (Don’t hold your breath during all exercises). Repeat depending on rep range.










Dumbbell High Pull
Often an Olympic style exercise is used during a power phase of the resistance programme for competitive rowers. In most cases it will be the power clean. Great exercise but it has some limitations when used by rowers. For a start if you are using an Olympic bar on the ground the starting position is quite high. Therefore it will produce a limited flexion of the legs and torso. Flexion of these joints is greatest during the start of catch phase. 
(Source: www.carlosdinares.com. Image by Unknown)

The greatest need for power production is in the earliest stages of the rowing stroke.  (As you can see in t graph 1). The trouble with using power cleans on the ground is you miss the early position with the greatest flexion in the lower body

Graph 1.
Handle force and handle velocity versus power for a rowing stroke. Figure from Dr. Valery Kleshnev’s Rowing Biomechanics Newsletter March 2014
I introduced a stable box so the deep catch position can be copied by the starting position of an Olympic lift. Using a box will place a greater demand on flexibility so you might have to work on the depth and start with a lighter load. I also prefer the high pull Olympic lift over a power clean because in the power clean the catch of the bar has little use to a rower. You can use an Olympic bar or dumbbell for high pulls. In this case I went with dumbbells because they increase the demands on stability during the exercise.

Starting Position
Stand on a stable box or step. Feet should be a similar spacing as in the rowing position, toes forward and slightly outward. Standing with back rigid and flat or slightly arched. Eyes on horizon. Simultaneously fully extend the lower extremity joints and quickly shrug shoulders. Pull arms as high as possible. Aim for the armpits with the dumbbells.










Finishing Position
After the lower body has fully extended and the dumbbells reached near maximal height, control the dumbbells back down to starting position and repeat depending on rep range.















Bent-over dumbbell Row
Towards of the end of the drive phase the rower engages scapular adduction and elbow extension.  There are several row style exercises you can do in the gym to activate the same muscle group involved in the phase. I see the prone row used in a lot of rowing programmes it has its limitations. Preforming the exercise on a bench decreases the range of motion and cuts out the most important part of the exercise.  The last 20% of the range of motion (ROM) should focus on scapular adduction.  I prefer to use bent over dumbbell row because you a get a greater ROM and you also get an integration between the legs, core and shoulder complex.

Starting position
Start with feet shoulder with apart. Hold the dumbbells with a neutral grip shoulder width apart. Bend at the hips while keeping the back and neck in a neutral position. Hold dumbbells just above knees.













Up-phase
Pull Dumbbells up toward stomach while keeping your elbows close to your sides. Draw shoulder blades together at the top of the exercise.

Down Phase
Slowly lower dumbbells to starting position.












Seated Double Cable Row
The seated cable row is another great common exercise in a rowing programme. The seated cable row is a similar exercise to the bent over dumbbell row with a focus on the later phase of the drive.  I started using double cable seated row with rowers to be even more specific to a sculling technique. With the individual cables you can mimic the part of the phase before you start with recovery. Another change to the traditional technique of a seated row I use is a reach forward like the catch phase and back extension as you pull the cables back. Again you are integrating the different muscle groups together similar to the rowing stroke.

Starting Phase
Sit with a slight bend in your knees. Reach forward with two D handles to the starting position similar to the catch position of a rowing stroke.














Pull Phase
Pull Cables toward stomach while keeping your elbows close to your sides. Draw shoulder blades together at the top of the exercise. Then with control return to the starting position.














Swissball Rollout
The two contact points for force production of the rowing stroke are the feet and the hands. The bum doesn't count because the seat moves. The middle of these two points is the core (torso). Newton's Third Law, For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. You push with your legs and pull with your arms. With rowing, force travels from the legs into the boat and from your upper body into the oars which drive the boat forward in the water.  Your body’s ability to transfer this force as economically as possible will increase the amount of force you can apply and give you speed on the water. A strong core (torso) is essential for this process.

The swissball rollout is a great core exercise producing high demands on core strength and stability. I like the way it integrates the hip and shoulder complexes into the exercise.




Starting Point
Knee on a swissball in front of a bench.  Keep back and neck in a neutral position throughout the exercise. Start with knees bent and hands or elbows on the bench depending on your experience with this type of training.







Rollout Phase
Roll the swissball out with you knees while keeping your neck and spine in neutral position. Limit the range of motion when you start. Increase the distance you roll the ball as you become more confident with the exercise. Swissball rollouts are demanding, if you feel pain in the lower back limit the range. Slow return to the starting position.








Richard Leonard BSc Sports and Exercise Science
Personal Trainer
M: 07511468490
Web: Personal Training Clifton
E: rlbodytrainer@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rlbodytrainer

Twitter: @LesmillsPT

Wednesday, September 16, 2015

The Ultimate Shoulder Endurance Exercise

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The ShoulderBurner.


One of my favourite #bootcamp creations.

Total body training focusing on shoulder endurance, core (torso stability) and the #cardiovascular system.

Can be performed indoors or outdoors. You will need 10m of clear space to run.

Dumbbell weight 70 to 80%rep max. 






Standing Shoulder Dumbbell press
Standing with slight bend in knees core switched on, chest up, eyes on horizon. Breathe in on the way down out as you press up. Elbows slightly forward as you bring dumbbells down.

Fit Ball Run
Run/jog with fit ball above head. Slight bend in elbows, core switched on, chest up, eyes on horizon.

Start;

Standing shoulder dumbbell press

  1. 1min Then 20m run with fit ball above head.
  2. Next, 45sec shoulder press 40m run with fit ball
  3. Next, 30sec shoulder press 60m run with fit ball
  4. Last, 15sec shoulder press 80m run with fit ball.


Done.

Personal Training Clifton
www.rlbodytrainer.co.uk

Thursday, August 27, 2015

Hengrove Bootcamp

Hengrove Bootcamp

Moday 730pm
Tuesday 930am
Thursday 645am
Thursday 930am

All over body workouts using a large range of exercise

Resistance training
Shuttles
Yoga
Core and Abbs
Functional Body weight exercise
Boxing





Personal Trainer
M: 07511468490
E: rlbodytrainer@gmail.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/rlbodytrainer
Twitter: @LesmillsPT

Tuesday, August 4, 2015

How does Leptin contribute to an increase in bodyfat

Personal Training Clifton


Personal Training bristol

The relationship between Leptin and weight management.

We consume an average of 1 million calories per year. What is amazing is we have a 99.6% accuracy balancing energy in (food) and energy out (exercise, living). The bad news is the more we train the more we eat. After 2 years 70% to 95% of people studied return to their starting weight.

 We use a fat regulating system involving the hormone Leptin. Leptin is released by fat cells and has been shown to decrease apatite. So.. the more fat we have the less we want to eat? unfortunately its not so simple. It looks like Leptin insensitivity has a greater effect on weight gain. Research is limited around this topic but it looks like genes, lifestyle factors and diet could effect the bodies sensitivity to leptin. Our bodies could be fooled into gaining body fat to increase leptin levels.

 Some studies I looked at suggested a link between refined sugars, artificial sugars and fructose (fruit sugars) with a increase in Leptin insensitivity and therefore possible weight gain. Its looking like our genes have a greater play in deciding who has a weight battle and who can have a six pack and eat pies.

 The bottom line is..at this point in time your genes are mapped out, how you choose to deal with them is up to you.Personally I love been fit and fairly healthy. So concentrate on your health; exercise regularly, eat healthy and enjoy life.


Remember one pint is equal to 40mins of brisk walking so space your pubs apart. ;-)

Personal Trainer
M: 07511468490
E: rlbodytrainer@gmail.com
Twitter: @LesmillsPT

Monday, July 27, 2015

Time to get off the couch

Time to get off the couch. To receive benefits to your health from exercise the recommend weekly activity is 75mins vigorous exercise (Hiit, spin, boxing, Running etc) or 150mins moderate exercise (walking) per week. Research has found that if you exercise more then the recommended amounts the health benefits won't increase proportionally to the amount of exercise. In other words the curve begins to flatten out. This doesn't mean you shouldn't workout more then recommend. We like to train for other reasons like it's fun or we enjoy the challenge. What is scary is in the UK only 6% of males and 3% of females reach this weekly target. The age of the sloth is well and truly here. Research has also found inactivity has the same effect as smoking 20 cigarettes per day on your health. One study found. A fit obese person has 1/2 chance of dying in the next decade then a healthy weight category unfit person. We seem to be obsessed with weight loss when in reality we should be focusing on activity first. Two high intensity classes a week is all you need or just over a 20mins of walking each day. Will help improve your quality of life and help save the NHS. 'You can do it'

Thursday, May 14, 2015

Resistance Training For Netball

Athletes have used resistance training for over half a century now to improve their sporting performance. From weekend warriorette to professional netball player a well-designed gym based resistance programme will improve your physical attributes and decrease the chance of injury.

With a combination of skills such as running, jumping, throwing and catching, netball places great demands on the body. With these physical demands there are also risks. During the 2014 season netball had the second highest amount of ACC injury claims behind rugby union. The most common injury site was the ankle, followed by the knee. The focus of a good training programme must be to address the physical demands and decrease the rate of injury of any sport.

Resistance training will give the greatest benefit to explosive speed (power) and agility on the netball court. Traditionally the two main techniques used to increase power in the gym are strength training (resistance training) and speed training (plyometrics and Olympic lifts).

Strength training focuses on increasing an athlete’s force production therefore in the equation, power equals forces X distance / the time, and an increase in force = an increase in power. The main drawback with this type of training is increasing force generally means increasing mass. Increasing the mass of an athlete can have a negative affect on agility and fitness around the court. Plyometrics and Olympic lifts will produce some strength improvement although their main focus is to increase the speed of producing force of the nervous system.

The nervous system is very specific, if you training using explosive movements you become more explosive. Nowadays most sport trainers use a combination of the two for optimal results. I believe combining Olympic lifts, traditional strength training and plyometrics in a movement specific programme will give the best power increases for netball.

Agility is affected by factors such as: strength, power, coordination and balance. Although the practice court is the best place to learn the skills needed to play netball the gym can help improve agility. Like all physical attributes if you want to improve agility you must force the body to adapt by placing it in an environment it finds hard to cope with. Equipment such as wobble boards and Swiss balls or using one-legged exercises will increase the demands of the nervous system and produce improvement.

Decreasing injuries must be a priority when designing a resistance programme. An injury to a key-player can mean the end of a championship title chase. Injuries to the knees and ankles are the greatest threat to netballer’s availability. Apart from increasing strength and agility the other key area is to increase the strength and use of the stabilising muscles of the lower leg joints. Stabilising muscles are used to help protect the joints of the body. Creating an unstable environment will force the muscles to work even harder and improve their ability. Although fit, agile players will put themselves at great risk they also need the physical conditioning to cope with the demands of modern netball.


The Exercise Programme

Before commencing this programme seek clearance from a medical practitioner. At least a six-week conditioning programme designed by a qualified instructor should be completed before commencing this programme.
The following programme is an example of an all-over body resistance programme focusing on the specific movement patterns of netball. The key factors are explosive power, balance and strength needed for netball. The programme is best used after completing a conditioning phase to build strength and coordination needed for the following exercises. The programme should be followed for no more than 4 weeks. After completion, seek help from a qualified instructor or personal trainer for a change of programme.

Possible periodisation programme for netball

Phase Weeks Workouts (per week) Reps Load Rest
Conditioning 4 3-4 12-8 Medium 60sec
Strength 4 3 8-6 Heavy 120sec
Specific (Peaking) 4 2-3 15-12 Medium 30sec

The above table is an example of a pre-season periodisation programme. If possible complete 16 weeks before the start of the season. You can also start this cycle any time however be careful not to over-fatigue before games. Once the season commences, try a non-linear training plan described in Issue 8 of Femme Fitness and Lifestyle. I recommend 2 resistance workouts per week, first workout focusing on strength and the second on power.
The following programme should be completed 2-3 times per week (With at least 1 rest day between workouts). Work your resistance training around netball practice and games making sure you have time to recover before games. Core-stability training (abdominals and lower back) should be completed 2-3 days per week. A warm-up of 5-10 minutes cardio should be completed at the start of the workout. A warm-down and full body stretch session should be completed at the end.

Sets Reps Load Tempo Rest
Backward lunge on wobble board 3-4 15-12 3-6kg ball Fast 30sec
Squat jump with medicine ball 3-4 15-12 3-6 kg ball Fast 30sec
Boxed plyometric press up 3-4 15-12 B/weight Fast 30sec
Alternating dumbbell bent over row 3-4 15-12 Med Fast 30sec
Push press 3-4 15-12 Med Fast 30sec


The Exercises

Do not hold your breath, breathe out on exertion. Select a load suitable for the rep range. Although the tempo is fast, maintain technique throughout exercise, once you lose your technique, STOP!

Backward lunge on wobble board with a medicine ball twist

This exercise is great for improving balance and coordination specific to netball. The nature of the exercise helps improve the stability of the ankles and knees, which are areas at risk while playing netball. Start without the wobble board if you have trouble balancing.

Starting position
Place right foot on wobble board while holding the medicine ball on your chest. Keep back and neck in neutral position and abdominals strong throughout entire lift.
Backwards lunge and side twist

Perform a backwards lunge while twisting the medicine ball to the same side as the fixed leg. Keep feet parallel and hips facing forward throughout the entire movement. Keep eyes on the horizon and the chest up throughout the exercise.

High knee and ball lift

Return to starting position, then using the same leg used in the backwards lunge, lift the knee as high as possible while maintaining a neutral back position. Press the medicine ball above your head at the same time as the knee lift. Finish rep range then swap sides.

Squat jump with medicine ball

This exercise is used to help improve jump height and explosive power. The horizontal medicine ball press is added to create the specific movement pattern found in netball. Practice the exercise first without too much intensity to master the coordination
Starting position

Feet should be between hip and shoulder width apart, toes forward and slightly outward. Keep elbows high, eyes on the horizon and the chest up. Hold the medicine ball to your chest.

Down phase

Move with hips first then knees. Squat as if sitting into a chair, keeping the abdominals strong. Stop descent if the heels start to rise or the pelvis tilts backward. Stop when the thighs are parallel to the floor.

Up phase

Explosively drive through your heels using your glutes and quads. Try for as much height as possible in the jump. At the same time press the medicine ball horizontally from your chest. Keep eyes on the horizon, abdominals strong and the chest up throughout the movement.

Boxed plyometric press up

Plyometric exercises are used to improve power and speed. This exercise focuses on those aspects while demanding a level of coordination seen in a netball pass.

Starting position
Start with hands on two Nike step boxes (or similar) slightly greater then shoulder width apart. Perform full press-ups or on knees depending on strength.

Wide placement
Keep back and neck in neutral position throughout entire press up. Stop when upper arms are parallel to the floor then return to starting position. In one movement hop down so hands are placed on the floor between the boxes.

Narrow placement

Perform a tricep press up while maintaining a neutral back and neck position. Explosively press up into the wide hand placement.

Alternating dumbbell bent over row

Although netball involves pushing movements, you have to train the back. This ensures a balance to the body and less risk of injury.

Starting position
Start with feet shoulder with apart. Hold the dumbbells with an opposing grip. Bend at the hips while keeping the back and neck in a neutral position. Start with one dumbbell close to your side and the other in the down position.

Down and up phases
While pulling one dumbbell to your side, the opposite dumbbell should be lowered. You can have some rotation through the spine but make sure you maintain a neutral back and neck position. Imagine a rod running down your spine that your torso is rotating around.

Push press

The push press comes from the Olympic lifting family of exercises. It is a great exercise for improving explosive power in movements above the head. The weight (load) used for this exercise should be greater then traditional shoulder press because of the addition of more body parts being used in the lift.

Up phase
Feet should be between hip and shoulder width apart, toes forward and slightly outward. Hold the barbell with a grip slightly to the outside of your shoulders and your elbows under your hands. Keep back and neck in neutral position and abdominals strong throughout entire lift. Start in a quarter squat position. Push the barbell up in an explosive movement using your arms, legs and calves. In this case do not lock your elbows at the top of the movement.

Down phase
Slowly lower the barbell to the starting position. Do not let gravity lower the barbell control the descent.

Good luck
RL Bodytrainer
www.rlbodytrainer.co.uk

Thursday, January 22, 2015

Functional Training 101

Personal Training Clifton

Personal Training Clifton

( I wrote this article for a New Zealand fitness mag in 2002 long before I had heard about training systems like crossfit. I missed that boat)

The Advantages of Doing Functional Compound Sets

We are more often looking towards the gym to help give them that edge during sports. There is also a greater desire to achieve the lean athletic look of a sportsperson, without a large increase in muscle mass as seen in bodybuilding athletes. If you want to look like an athlete then it helps to train like one. This article explains how using one technique called ‘Compound sets’ has benefits over traditional weight training, especially when the desired goal is functional performance. You might have heard of compound exercises this is where more than one joint is involved in a single movement (i.e., bench press or squat). A compound set is simply when two or more exercises are involved in a single set.

A large number of traditional weight training exercises originate from a bodybuilding background, which focuses on growth and symmetry of individual muscles or body parts. With this style of training, isolation of joints and muscle groups (i.e., bicep curl or hamstring curl) will occur. If your goal in the gym is for functional athletic performance or weight loss there are three main drawbacks with traditional weight training.

Training the nervous system is highly specific. Isolating body parts as seen in many traditional weight-training exercises will adapt the nervous system to be more efficient at isolated movement. If you train the nervous system to isolate individual muscle groups it will decrease it’s ability to coordinate muscle groups into complex movements such as jumping or throwing a ball. Using compound sets will train the nervous system to coordinate between multiple muscle groups and to achieve a greater number of complex movement patterns. This closely resembles the athletic demands placed on our coordination during sport.

Traditional weight training split programmes causes a short-term muscle imbalance within the body. Fatiguing one muscle group without fatiguing the opposing muscle group creates this muscle imbalance. Research has found the knee is more susceptible to injury if there is an imbalance between quadriceps and hamstring strength, e.g. if you train quadriceps on one day and then hamstrings another day. A well-designed compound set will work the body as a whole and is less likely to cause the body these short-term muscle imbalances.

Boxing personal Training clifton
A large number of sports require an intermittent maximal effort, which places great demands on the anaerobic system. Sports such as netball, tennis, squash and many other sports played in New Zealand require short bursts of sprinting with small rest periods in-between. The greater number of muscles being used at once means a greater amount of energy is required. Heavy load compound sets tend to be more demanding on the anaerobic system because of the larger number of muscles required to complete the exercise. When weight loss is the goal, compound sets can burn more calories for the same amount of time spent on a set. Traditional weight training exercises tend to use a smaller number of muscles during each exercise and therefore burn fewer calories.

The Training Programme

Compound sets should not be used if you have very little or no weight training experience. A six-week conditioning programme designed by a qualified instructor should be completed before introducing compound sets to your workouts. Before using compound sets, practice the individual exercises first. A range of tempos can be used during the sets. It is advised to start with slow tempos until the individual feels fully competent with the complex movements.

Follow this programme for no more than four weeks or add these compound sets to an existing programme.

Weight training 2 - 3 times per week. One day on, one day off. 2-3 days per week do cardio and core-stability (Abdominal and lower back).

Example: 4 Week programme

Sets Reps Load Rest
Week 1 2 15 Light 90
Week 2 3 12 Medium 60
Week 3 3 12 Medium 60
Week 4 4 10 Heavy 45

bootcamp personal training bristol
Compound Sets:

1. Burpee-out, Press up (Knees or Full), Burpee-in, Power-clean, Push press (Using Dumbbells)

Starting Position
Place dumbbells shoulder width apart with the handles parallel to each other.

Burpee-out.
Grip dumbbells shoulder width apart, keep back and neck in neutral position. Keep abdominals strong, burpee out to press up position

Press up.
Start press up at full position or move to knees. Keep back and neck in neutral position throughout entire press up.

Burpee-in.
If press-ups were preformed on knees return to full position. Burpee in toward barbell and adjust to starting power clean position.

Power-clean.
Feet should be between hip and shoulder width apart, toes forward and slightly outward. Standing with back rigid and flat or slightly arched. Simultaneously fully extend the lower extremity joints and quickly shrug shoulders. Pull arms as high as possible. After the lower body has fully extended and the bar reached near maximal height, pull the body under the bar by rotating arms and hands. The bar should be caught across the shoulders.


Push-press
Bend the knees slightly as if starting a squat then explosively push the dumbbells up using your calves, legs and arms. Finishing in a shoulder press position. Keep your abdominals strong throughout the movement and be careful not to hyperextend the lower back.

Finishing
While maintaining a flat back slowly flex the hips and knees and lower the dumbbells to the starting position.


2. Hang Clean, Front squat, Push Press

Starting Position
Feet should be between hip and shoulder width apart, toes forward and slightly outward. Standing with back rigid and flat or slightly arched. Bar resting slightly above knees

Hang Clean
Simultaneously fully extend the lower extremity joints and quickly shrug shoulders. Pull arms as high as possible. After the lower body has fully extended and the bar reached near maximal height, pull the body under the bar by rotating arms and hands. The bar should be caught across the shoulders.

Front Squat
Feet should be between hip and shoulder width apart, toes forward and slightly outward. Keep elbows high, eyes on the horizon and the chest up. Move with hips first then knees. Squat as if sitting into a chair, keeping the abdominals strong. Stop decent if the heels start to rise or the pelvis tilts backward. Stop when the thighs are parallel to floor.

Push press
Start push press halfway through up phase of the squat. Explosively push up the dumbbells up using calves, legs and arms. Finishing in a shoulder press position. Keep the abdominals strong throughout the movement and be careful not to hyperextend the lower back.

Finishing
While maintaining a flat back slowly flex the hips and knees and lower the dumbbells to the starting Hang clean position.



3. Backwards Lunge with barbell, High knee.


Start
Stand with barbell in finished shoulder press position. Hand position should be wider than the shoulders. Arms should be straight, do not lock out elbows (this exercise should be started with the weakest side first and the same amount of reps preformed on both sides).

Backwards Lunge
Perform a backwards lunge while keeping barbell in fixed position. Keep feet parallel and hips facing forward throughout the entire movement. Keep eyes on the horizon and the chest up throughout the exercise.

High Knee
Return to starting position. Then, using the same leg used in the backwards lunge, lift the knee as high as possible while maintaining a neutral back position.

Finishing
Once the knee has reached maximum height the cycle should then repeat by starting a backwards lunge again.

Personal Trainer
M: 07511468490
E: rlbodytrainer@gmail.com
Twitter: @LesmillsPT